Media Coverage

Nobody Moves Alone  –  Jennifer Bury

Translated from original interview in German with: Katja Schneider, Münchner Feuilleton, October 2017

Photo by Franz Kimmel

It began for me in the middle of the 1980s in the Hasting Studio, which at that time was still situated in a breathtaking location in the English Garden In Munich. For more than half a century, the school was housed on the upper floor of the university – an institution for me: as a child, as a student, even later. At one time, Jennifer Bury stood in front of our class, American, tall, slender, brown curls, laughed, and put forth to us her choreography to “Walk like an Egyptian” from the Bangles. And off we went with a half profiles, which had never been seen on any Greek frieze. It was fun, it was an experiment, and Jennifer Bury was in the middle of it.

More or less exactly 30 years ago this evening Jennifer was back in the studio. I remember well, because I experienced practically what I knew theoretically: the principle of
kinesthetic resonance. That we got to experience this principle so effortlessly and directly is due to Jennifer. Humorous, self-organized, playful, she made it easy to dance together, to learn together. Nobody moves alone, even if you move on your own.

Jennifer’s training as a dancer and choreographer began quite normally, she received a degree from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and danced with Mucha Purucker during her Munich time, she sparkled with a quality that fascinated me, but which I could not describe in words; probably she was not aware of me at that time.

Connections
Today, Jennifer Bury is a Movement Therapist with her own practice in San Francisco, a Gestalt therapist, a specialist in dance medicine, has training in Pilates, and many other forms. In addition, she has a black belt in Aikido. When asked what she is doing with this large portfolio of techniques, practices, and certifications – from Bartenieff Fundamentals to myofascial massage and yoga, she said, “I’m learning, and teaching, how to be receptive and responsive to the world. I move through the world as the world moves through me. It is about discovering connections, strengthening or restoring contact with myself and my environment. Because when you expand your range of movement options, you also expand your emotional abilities and your ability to connect with others.”

Jennifer Bury regularly returns to Munich to teach workshops at Tanzentdenz. Her courses provide the theoretical, practical and interactive nature of how we communicate nonverbally. How do we connect with others and our environment? And what enables or disables our sense of connection? This micro-research has great influence on the macro level of our lived experience. The more heterogeneous the group, the more interesting for Jennifer: “The dancers are movement experts, but non-dancers – and I love these combinations –  teach the dancers what they have forgotten, what they’ve trained out of themselves. The non-dancers benefit from the experience of the dancers, and the dancers benefit from the freedom of the non-dancers. This is mutual learning and cross pollination. If you work with homogeneous groups, you all tend to stay within your familiar movement vocabulary.

Dissolve and rearrange
This Autumn (2017) Jennifer Bury will come to Munich again before going on to teach in Paris. In her workshop: ”Meeting in Motion: Connecting through Difference” we are dealing with “reaching, grasping, pushing, and pulling”, a few of our primary movements which play a central role in the development of our behavior including how we relate to others, throughout our lives.

Generating opportunities, recognizing potential, deepening communication, that also interests Veronica Fischer. The Munich dancer (formerly also in Micha Purucker’s Dance Energy), Bodytherapist, Feldenkrais practitioner and yoga instructor, she developed her own method of somatic bodywork. “BEGIN”, as the program says, allows the body to be experienced through slow and careful exertion. As Veronica explains: ”This leads, on one hand, to loosening and freeing up compacted body layers or unfavorable movement patterns, and on the other hand, it also helps in reorganizing and further developing the possibilities that we have created”. To do this she incorporates the movements of the Feldenkrais method and yoga postures. “This is how two things come together: the sensitive feeling which can lead to discovery, and the exact anatomical alignment in a vertical axis.” Anyone, young or old, is ready to consciously feel their body. “This way we’re not tempted to repeat mechanical movements.”

The highlighted WEG in “beWEGen” refers to the origins of human movement development, from pulsating and flipping over as the “fish body” into creeping and crawling to finally arrive upright. The aim is to anchor oneself in one’s own body “as the basis for an aware presence and self-responsibility”.

For the first time, Veronica Fischer is offering this advanced training in somatic bodywork in six 3-day modules. The series, which starts in January 2018, is designed for body oriented educators, therapists, sports instructors, yoga instructors and dancers. Fischer will give an overview of the course this October and November which she says: ” is something for “people who have patience for slow, deep, body work which leads to self-examination.” Assisting as guest lecturers are the Munich dance physician Liane Simmel and – Jennifer Bury.


The Teacher  –  Jennifer Bury

Translated from original interview in German with: Katja Schneider, Tanz Magazine, November 2016

2014-08-07-12-27-01You are a movement therapist with a private practice in San Francisco, have trained extensively in Gestalt therapy, are a dance medicine specialist and Pilates trainer, have a degree in dance from the Tisch School of the Arts in New York University, and have worked internationally as a dancer, choreographer and teacher. In addition, you have a black belt in Aikido. What do you teach?
To be receptive and responsive to the world around you. I move through the world as the world moves through me.

What does that mean in concrete terms?
I work with people at all levels: physical, emotional, and intellectual; I can use a  physiotherapy approach, to address physical issues or a Gestalt therapy approach to address the emotional aspects, depending on what is needed.  These days, I also work with people via Skype. The aim of my work is to restore a sense of connection; a sense of integration within ourselves which in turn strengthens our ability to connect with others and adapt to our environment.

A year doesn’t go by in which you do not complete a course, further education or advanced training. Whether in Bartenieff Fundamentals, Feldenkrais and Alexander Technique, or shiatsu and yoga, breathing and massage techniques, to mention just a few fields that you have studied. Is this due to your fundamental curiosity?
As a young person, I thought someone had already figured out the “right” way, and I just needed to find that perfect technique. To this day I haven’t found one method which applies to everyone.  Instead of adapting someone to a technique, I prefer to spontaneously combine aspects of different techniques in response to what arises with each individual. It is exciting to help people discover their strengths, and what works for them. This way, I get to learn from professionals as well as from my clients and bring together all the different elements. Which means I am experimenting and making discoveries daily.  For profound learning it’s important to find someone who excites your curiosity rather than what someone is teaching.

Who was this person for you?
There were a few. The first was my mother. She studied with Joe Pilates in New York in the 1950-60s and would do her Pilates mat work naked on the floor every morning and I would join her. She closed the curtain, took off her bathrobe, and did her “hundred” naked which was very playful, funny, and intimate, but we were also seriously trying to perform these unfamiliar movements and were involved in that process together.  This became the basis of my work.

I remember the modern dance classes which you taught at the Hastings Studio in Munich in the early 1980s. How did you come to be involved with such a broad range of different therapies?
Shortly after completing my dance education at NYU, I flew to Europe with a one-way ticket, and traveled from country to country with just my backpack. I had created a press kit of my choreography in the U.S. and attended different performances and if I liked the work I’d approach the director of the company or the choreographer and ask if they would like to collaborate with me. I was 22 years old when I went to a performance in Munich which included a dance by Micha Puruker which touched me deeply, and to this day he is still a very close friend. In 1985 I went back to New York and created my dance company there, but I soon discovered that living and working there was difficult and exhausting.  Dancing had always been the way in which I could express myself fully and freely, where I felt whole.  When I was performing I couldn’t see the audience, I was pouring my heart out to them through my movement and I couldn’t feel any response.  But when I was teaching I could feel the connection; We were dancing together and learning together.  When I realized how alone and unfulfilled I felt, I stopped performing.  Now I dance and choreograph every day with my clients!

You continue to work within the context of dance. What should participants in your workshops expect?
Dancers are movement experts, but non-dancers – and I love these combinations –  teach the dancers what they have forgotten, what they’ve trained out of themselves. The non-dancers benefit from the experience of the dancers, and the dancers benefit from the freedom of the non-dancers. This is mutual learning and cross pollination. If you work with homogeneous groups, you all tend to stay within your familiar movement vocabulary.

Where will you teach your next course?
At the Tanztendenz Munich (from Nov. 18 to Nov. 20, registration until Nov. 7) and also at Rituel Studio Paris (Nov. 23 & 24). “Beyond Words: The Connection Between Us” incorporates theoretical, practical and playful interactive learning about how we communicate through movement.  Together we will explore the kinesthetic resonance which exists between us. The aim is to experience the depth of our connection to the environment and to others, and all the possibilities that this inherent connection offers.